FAQ

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Is the story fictional, or is it historical?

Who is the book's true author?

If this is a novel, then why the Study Guide?

How can the Study Guide be useful to a small group?

Was Dohai's disease fictional?

Does the author suggest that sibling matrimony may be acceptable, from God's viewpoint, under any circumstances?

Do Anabaptist churches embrace the theology of Reverend Klaus Lehmann?

Why was the Anabaptist carrying a pistol?

Are the native tribes mentioned in the book fictional?



Is the story fictional, or is it historical?   (Back to Top)

As stated on the copyright page, the specific events in this book, as well as the characters, are fictional, including those of [Aquila] Navarro and [Desi] Zavala [García], and any resemblance to actual persons or events is coincidental.

Of course, the story's contextual events, such as the Mexican Revolution, World Wars I and II, and so on, are clearly historical facts.


Who is the book's true author?   (Back to Top)

Brad Fenichel is the one and only author of When We Pipe, God Shall Dance.

For more information, see the "Author" page.


If this is a novel, then why the study guide?   (Back to Top)

All of us can remember at least one college professor who would start class with a story, or sometimes a joke, that encapsulated the day's topic. And though it might have been a lame joke, it still helped us remember the otherwise dry material in the lesson.

Jesus' sermons usually began with a story—that is, a parable!

In fact, a good number of successful books in the world of business today are set in parable form. For example: The Greatest Salesman in the World (Og Mandino), and Who Moved My Cheese? (Johnson and Blanchard).

So, as you guessed, this book is more than a novel. Think of it as one of those dry, preachy "inspirational" books, but set to the music of fiction instead! And, to make it an even easier read, the author has refrained from overloading the story with "message," opting instead to post his theses in the Study Guide that's located in the back of the book.


How can the Study Guide be useful to a small group?   (Back to Top)

As the Study Guide says, it's intended for "personal devotion and small groups."

For more information, see the "Study Guide" page on this site.


Was Dohai's disease fictional?   (Back to Top)

Unfortunately, no. It was a variety of Waardenburg syndrome. Many suffer from this disease today.

The following website has a brief description of the disease:
Waardenburg Syndrome

There are also myriad medical sites that have more in-depth information about the various strains and symptoms. This condition, being a dominant trait, requires only one parent to pass it along to the child.


Does the author suggest that sibling matrimony may be acceptable, from God's viewpoint, under any circumstances?   
(Back to Top)


Short answer: No.
Long answer: Certainly not!


Do Anabaptist churches embrace the theology of Reverend Klaus Lehmann?   (Back to Top)

First, let us be clear that, in our day, "Anabaptist" is a broad term generally referring to a number of fine associations of Christian churches such as the Amish, Bretheren, Hutterite, and Mennonite, which trace their roots back to the Anabaptist movement in 16th-century Europe.

Furthermore, although the story mentions that Willi Wagner's family was Anabaptist (which accounted for his righteous aversion to violence), the Reverend Klaus Lehmann was merely a friend of the family—not necessarily Anabaptist himself.

The point is that, whether we realize it or not, we modern-day believers—of all denominations and walks of life—have, to some degree or another, bought into a "distant God" mentality.


Why was the Anabaptist carrying a pistol?   (Back to Top)

His exact words were, "Unarmed? Certainly not in these hills!”

The Hidalgo Sierra is home to a wide variety of wildlife, including some unfriendly types, such as javelina and mountain lion.

We may recall how Jesus Himself encouraged His disciples to be provisioned against difficult times ahead, with money, as well as with two swords—which He specifically told them were sufficient for the group of eleven disciples (Luke 22:35-38). Clearly, they needed to prepare for spending time in the Judean hills, which were also inhabited by mountain cats. And, it seems Peter himself misunderstood, for Jesus had to rebuke him, only a few hours later, for using one of those two swords on a person! (See Matthew 26:51-52)


Are the native tribes mentioned in the book fictional?   (Back to Top)

The native people groups mentioned in the book are real; they are alive and well in Mexico today. The book's description of their cultures, languages, architecture, and cuisine are all true to life.

However, the story's specific characters and events are fictional.